|
plan du site | contact


Bienvenue sur cet espace de discussion ouvert à tous !
La passion des Beatles nous réunit,
mais tous les sujets sont possibles, vous avez la parole
et nous sommes là pour répondre à vos questions !

Se connecter pour vérifier ses messages privés Messagerie privée Rechercher Rechercher
Liste des Membres Liste des Membres Profil Profil
Connexion Connexion FAQ FAQ
S'enregistrer S'enregistrer (nouvel utilisateur)
  Lucy in the web Index du Forum > Coups de coeur
  Sujet : Sinatramania
Aller à la page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Suivante
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet
Voir le sujet précédent :: Voir le sujet suivant  
Auteur Message
Don Everly



Inscrit le: 03 Déc 2005
Messages: 3098
Localisation: Kentucky

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:04 am    Sujet du message: Sinatramania Répondre en citant

J'en discutais avec Filou, c'est marrant comme en Europe (continentale), on sous estime la Sinatramania !


En effet, Sinatra n'a pas toujours été le vieux monsieur en smoking avec une moumoute, ni même le quadra des années 50, non, Sinatra en son temps, comme Elvis puis les Beatles, a vraiment suscité des émeutes, et les critiques acerbes des adultes...mais seulement voila, à la même époque, nous avions une occupation, et un autre personnage qui faisait fuhrer en Europe, ce qui explique qu' a part l'Angleterre (encore libre même si bombardée) nous somme un peu passé à coté de la Sinatramania...



Sinatramania: audiences in 1944 and 1945











The depth of Sinatra’s spell [during Sinatramania] was best measured not in dollars but in newly minted words, whose roots were based around ‘Sinatra’ and ‘swoon.’ Sinatra became not just a proper name to conjure with, but a vocabulary—‘the most extravagant vocabulary ever constructed around one man,” as E.J. Kahn noted. Among the new press coinages were Sinatrance, Swoonheart, Sinatritis, Swoonology, Sinatralating, Swoonatra, Sinatraceptive, Swoonatrance, Sinatramania, Swoonatic, Sinatrick, Swoonster, Sinatruck, Swoonery, Sinatractive, Swoondoggler, Swoonism, Sinatraless, Screenatra, Sinatraism, Sinatraphile, Sinatraphobe, Sinatraddiction, Sinatradition, Sinatrish, Sinatrabugs, Sinatraltitude, Sinatraing, Sinatroops, and Sonatra…He was described variably as the Lean Lark, the Croon Prince of Swing, Moonlight Sinatra, Swoonlight Sinatra, the Swoon King, the Swing-Shift Caruso, the Sultan of Swoon, the Swami of Swoon, Mr. Swoon, the Larynx, the Svengali of Swing, the Bony Baritone, the Groovy Galahad, and Too-Frank-Sinatra.
-John Lahr, Sinatra: The Artist and the Man


Frankie leaving the Paramount Theatre in Brooklyn. 1942 was the year "Sinatramania" took off. He bragged around this time that: "Nobody's ever been a bigger star than me. This'll never end."















A crowd of "bobby soxers" at a Sinatra, Paramount show in 1942.


_________________
"Hey bird dog get away from my chick
Hey bird dog better get away quick
Bird dog you better find
A chicky little of your own ! "


Dernière édition par Don Everly le Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:16 am; édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Don Everly



Inscrit le: 03 Déc 2005
Messages: 3098
Localisation: Kentucky

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:05 am    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant




In December of 1942 Frank Sinatra was booked for a series of shows at the Paramount Theater in New York City. The 27-year-old singer had recently parted ways with Tommy Dorsey and was unsure if he'd make it on his own. Much to his shock, a small army of teenage girls swarmed the theater on the first night and went absolutely crazy when he took the stage. "The sound that greeted me was absolutely deafening," Sinatra recalled years later. "I was scared stiff. I couldn't move a muscle." The fans were labeled "Bobby soxers" because they were forced to dance at clubs in their bobby socks so their shoes wouldn't damage the floor. This mania around Sinatra occurred more than 20 years before Beatlemania, and it was the country's first glimpse of how the teenage culture would evolve in the second half of the twentieth century.
_________________
"Hey bird dog get away from my chick
Hey bird dog better get away quick
Bird dog you better find
A chicky little of your own ! "
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Don Everly



Inscrit le: 03 Déc 2005
Messages: 3098
Localisation: Kentucky

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:07 am    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant

The Columbus Day riot: Frank Sinatra is pop's first star
12 October 1944




On 12 October 1944, Frank Sinatra opened his third season at New York's Paramount theatre. It was Columbus Day, a public holiday, and the bobby-soxers turned out in force. The famed New York photographer Weegee (Arthur Fellig) was there with his camera and notebook, capturing the scene in hyperventilated prose.

"Oh! Oh! Frankie," he began, mimicking the girls' ululations. "The line in front of the Paramount theatre on Broadway starts forming at midnight. By four in the morning, there are over 500 girls … they wear bobby sox (of course), bow ties (the same as Frankie wears) and have photos of Sinatra pinned to their dresses …

"Then the great moment arrived. Sinatra appeared on stage ... hysterical shouts of 'Frankie ... Frankie'; you've heard the squeals on the radio when he sings. Multiply that by about a thousand times and you get an idea of the deafening noise."

For Weegee, this was another example of the human extremities that he documented with his instinct for the climatic moments in New York life: what he didn't mention was the fact that, after each performance, the Paramount was drenched in urine.

Like Rudolph Valentino's funeral in 1926, or The Wizard of Oz opening in 1939, the Columbus Day riot was a generation-defining media event acted out on Manhattan's streets: during the day some 30,000 frenzied bobby-soxers swarmed over Times Square in an exhilarated display of girl power.

The New Republic editor Bruce Bliven called it "a phenomenon of mass hysteria that is only seen two or three times in a century. You need to go back not merely to Lindbergh [Charles Lindbergh's first flight] and Valentino to understand it, but to the dance madness that overtook some German villages in the middle ages, or to the Children's Crusade." What was new was the power that one singer held, heralded by mass screaming, and the advent of the teenager as a social ideal. Sinatra was the first modern pop star.

Sinatra's fame had been steadily building. His breakthrough came in his first Paramount season in December 1942, when the theatre erupted with "five thousand kids stamping, yelling, screaming, applauding". These scenes only intensified during his return in May 1943. The mania overtook the hype: his press agents remembered hiring "girls to scream when he sexily rolled a note. But we needn't have. The dozen girls we hired to scream and swoon did exactly as we told them. But hundreds more we didn't hire screamed even louder. It was wild, crazy, completely out of control."

Although nearly 29 by October 1944, Sinatra was slightly built, nervous and youthful: "It was the war years," he later said, "there was a great loneliness. I was the boy in every corner drugstore, the boy who had gone to war."

In concert, he seduced his young audience. His bright blue eyes raked the crowd, singling out individuals so that he appeared to be singing for them alone, just one in a crowd of thousands. Matched to the ethereal kitsch of slow ballads such as Embraceable You, "The Voice" – as Sinatra was known – cast a spell that suspended time.

Sinatra's rise was unstoppable, for he filled a deep need. Bliven thought that the bobby-soxers at the Paramount "found in him, for all his youthfulness, something of a father image. And beyond that, he represents a dream of what they themselves might conceivably do or become."

In the mid-40s, Sinatra became a national figure of controversy and criticism. He was blamed for making young people lose "control of their emotions", and was attacked for being out of uniform: because of an injury, he had been ruled unfit for duty in 1943.

Yet his status was confirmed in September 1944 when he went to the White House and met the president. Franklin Roosevelt had already made public statements linking American politics with its popular music, but this meeting was a shrewdly taken opportunity to reaffirm that adolescents were a vital part of American society.

The Columbus Day riots coincided with the invention of the teenage market. In September 1944, the magazine Seventeen was launched, which declared to its primarily female readers: "you are the bosses of the business". It was an immediate success, selling half a million copies. Seventeen offered a non-patronising approach that struck a chord, and it focused Americans on the barely recognised purchasing power of adolescents: estimated at $750m (£465m).

The hysteria that surrounded Sinatra in October 1944 came at a crux time in the history of America and its youth. It reaffirmed the collective power of young women, and how they have always been central to pop.
_________________
"Hey bird dog get away from my chick
Hey bird dog better get away quick
Bird dog you better find
A chicky little of your own ! "
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Don Everly



Inscrit le: 03 Déc 2005
Messages: 3098
Localisation: Kentucky

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:07 am    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant



the precursor to all these fan outbreaks was the Columbus Day Riots—a Frank Sinatra concert in 1943 where 30,000 girls went wild and created a stampede.




_________________
"Hey bird dog get away from my chick
Hey bird dog better get away quick
Bird dog you better find
A chicky little of your own ! "


Dernière édition par Don Everly le Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:13 am; édité 2 fois
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Don Everly



Inscrit le: 03 Déc 2005
Messages: 3098
Localisation: Kentucky

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:11 am    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant








_________________
"Hey bird dog get away from my chick
Hey bird dog better get away quick
Bird dog you better find
A chicky little of your own ! "


Dernière édition par Don Everly le Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 4:50 am; édité 3 fois
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Zug



Inscrit le: 02 Oct 2004
Messages: 3335
Localisation: Paris

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:11 am    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant

Effectivement on connait peu ce phénomène ...
Perso, je l'ai découvert à travers un cartoon du génial Tex Avery..
J'en avais pas forcément conscience alors...
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé Envoyer un e-mail
Don Everly



Inscrit le: 03 Déc 2005
Messages: 3098
Localisation: Kentucky

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:14 am    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant

Excellent le cartoon ! Cool


Et j'ai trouvé un VRAI document sonore en MP3 (je l'ai en CD aussi mais bon...) qui permet d'entendre l'hystérie des jeunes filles quand FRankiiiiie chante ! :


http://www.powell-pressburger.org/ShooShooBaby.mp3
_________________
"Hey bird dog get away from my chick
Hey bird dog better get away quick
Bird dog you better find
A chicky little of your own ! "
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Zug



Inscrit le: 02 Oct 2004
Messages: 3335
Localisation: Paris

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:18 am    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant

C'est effectivement les mêmes images que celles qui rendaient compte de la folie autour d'Elvis et des Beatles...

Oui on a tendance à oublier cet aspect dans la carrière de Sinatra, chanteur de charme pour minettes..
Mais en France, Trénet a vécu aussi , toutes proportions gardées, la même chose...

Et finalement les minettes , quoi qu'on en pense, et à quelques exceptions près (Bruel , Justin Bieber) se trompent rarement sur la qualité d'un artiste.. Wink
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé Envoyer un e-mail
Zug



Inscrit le: 02 Oct 2004
Messages: 3335
Localisation: Paris

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:19 am    Sujet du message: Re: Sinatramania Répondre en citant

Don Everly a écrit:
J'en discutais avec Filou,

Ah bon?
on peut discuter avec ce mec?? Laughing
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé Envoyer un e-mail
Don Everly



Inscrit le: 03 Déc 2005
Messages: 3098
Localisation: Kentucky

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:24 am    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant

Moi oui ! Cool


Et déja engagé socialement et politiquement à l'époque, le Frankie, comme le prouve ce court métrage pour lequel il obtiendra un oscar :





Plot :

Sinatra, apparently playing himself, takes a "smoke" break from a recording session. He sees more than 10 boys chasing one boy and intervenes, first with dialogue; then with a little speech (including some guided imagery). His main points are that we are "all" Americans and that just one American's blood is as good as another, all our religions are equally to be respected.






Cliquer ICI :


http://archive.org/details/THE_HOUSE_I_LIVE_IN



The House I Live In was a 1945 short film written by Albert Maltz and made by producer Frank Ross and actor Frank Sinatra to oppose anti-Semitism and prejudice at the end of World War II.
It received a special Academy Award in 1946.
_________________
"Hey bird dog get away from my chick
Hey bird dog better get away quick
Bird dog you better find
A chicky little of your own ! "


Dernière édition par Don Everly le Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 2:41 pm; édité 3 fois
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Don Everly



Inscrit le: 03 Déc 2005
Messages: 3098
Localisation: Kentucky

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 3:30 am    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant

HOUSE I LIVE IN, THE LYRICS

Frank Sinatra


What is America to me?
A name, a map, or a flag I see;
A certain word, democracy.
What is America to me?

The house I live in,
A plot of earth, a street,
The grocer and the butcher,
Or the people that I meet;
The children in the playground,
The faces that I see,
All races and religions,
That's America to me.

The place I work in,
The worker by my side,
The little town or city
Where my people lived and died.
The howdy and the handshake,
The air and feeling free,
And the right to speak my mind out,
That's America to me.

The things I see about me,
The big things and the small,
The little corner newsstand,
And the house a mile tall;
The wedding and the churchyard,
The laughter and the tears,
And the dream that's been a growing
For a hundred-fifty years.

The town I live in,
The street, the house, the room,
The pavement of the city,
And the garden all in bloom;
The church, the school, the clubhouse,
The million lights I see,
But especially the people;
That's America to me.

The house I live in,
My neighbors white and black,
The people who just came here,
Or from generations back;
The town hall and the soapbox,
The torch of liberty,
A home for all God's children;
That's America to me.

The words of old Abe Lincoln,
Of Jefferson and Paine,
Of Washington and Jackson
And the tasks that still remain;
The little bridge at Concord,
Where Freedom's fight began,
Our Gettysburg and Midway
And the story of Bataan.

The house I live in,
The goodness everywhere,
A land of wealth and beauty,
With enough for all to share;
A house that we call Freedom,
A home of Liberty,
And it belongs to fighting people
That's America to me.



The song was memorably covered in later years by Paul Robeson, Mahalia Jackson, and Josh White. Sam Cooke also covered it. Sinatra continued to include it in his repertory, performing it in the White House. Bill Cosby used a recording to open some of his shows in 2002.
_________________
"Hey bird dog get away from my chick
Hey bird dog better get away quick
Bird dog you better find
A chicky little of your own ! "
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Zug



Inscrit le: 02 Oct 2004
Messages: 3335
Localisation: Paris

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 5:12 am    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant

Excellent topic...Parfaitement documenté..instructif
ça change avec ce qui se fait d'habitude... Cool

Citation:
« La première fois que j'ai entendu la voix de Frank, c'était sur un juke-box, dans la pénombre d'un bar, un dimanche après-midi, pendant que ma mère et moi, nous cherchions mon père. Je me souviens qu'elle m'a dit : “Ecoute ça, c'est Frank Sinatra. Il vient du New Jersey.” C'était une voix qui respirait le mauvais genre, la vie, la beauté, une voix chargée d'excitation, d'un méchant sens de la liberté, de sexe et d'une triste expérience de la marche du monde. On aurait dit que chaque chanson avait en post-scriptum : “Si t'aimes pas ça, prends celui-là dans la gueule !” Mais c'était le blues profond de la voix de Frank qui me touchait le plus. Sa musique devenait peut-être synonyme de nœud papillon, grande vie, grands crus, jolies femmes et raffinement, sa voix blues représentait toujours la chance qui vous fuit, ces hommes, au fond de la nuit, leur dernier billet de dix dollars en poche, qui cherchent un moyen de s'en sortir. Au nom de tout le New Jersey, Frank, laisse-moi te dire : “Salut, frangin, tu as craché l'âme de tes frères”5. »

Bruce Springteen
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé Envoyer un e-mail
Filou



Inscrit le: 14 Nov 2002
Messages: 22824
Localisation: Paname

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 9:12 am    Sujet du message: Re: Sinatramania Répondre en citant

Don Everly a écrit:
J'en discutais avec Filou, c'est marrant comme en Europe (continentale), on sous estime la Sinatramania !


Ben tu vois comme quoi... nos discussions ont parfois du bon Cool

Et je dois dire que ça m'a franchement donné envie à me pencher un peu sur ce p'tit gars-là.

C'est vrai que l'image en France de Franky n'est peut-être pas à la hauteur du phénomène mondial. En Europe aussi peut-être.
Peut-être pareil avec Elvis d'ailleurs. En France, Elvis peut avoir une certaine connotation qui n'est pas très en phase avec tout ce qu'il peut représenter à travers le monde.

Le parallèle entre les deux hommes est très intéressant.
Leur parcours, leur carrière, l'impact qu'ils avaient l'un et l'autre et ont encore aujourd'hui.
Et même ce côté "rock n' roll" qui se retrouve, malgré les apparences, chez l'un comme chez l'autre.

Moi je suis très clairement pro-Elvis. Sinatra, pas vraiment ma tasse de thé.
Je dirais même qu'il "y a pas photo" !!!

Mais comme dirait l'autre, il n'y a que les imbéciles qui ne changent pas d'avis Rolling Eyes


Enfin, c'est clair que Sinatra a toute sa place ici.
Et je crois bien qu'il est dans la place depuis un moment Cool



Morrison en est témoin.
Ca m'avait surpris de l'entendre déclarer que son modèle était Sinatra.



Don Everly a écrit:
Outre le fait que Frank fut la première idole des jeunes à faire hurler les jeunes filles (et humidifier leurs petites culottes... Embarassed ), à susciter des émeutes devant le Paramount de Newy York, il fut aussi la première vedette de son époque à vivre ouvertement en public sa vie de "rock star", sortant dans les lieus publics avec ses maitresses, buvant sans modération...Il affichait aussi ses opinions politiques de gauche bien avant Lennon, et fut traité de coco et de mafieux par la presse de Hearst, mettant son poing dans la figure de son édiorialiste Lee Mortimer, ce qui lui valut un procès qu'il a perdu...Puis aussi, et c'est moins glorieux, ses amitiés douteuses avec certains mafieux a contribuer à entretenir cette image de bad boy.

Donc Jim avait plusieurs raisons d'être fan de Sinatra, tout comme...Iggy Pop, grand fan de Sinatra et Presley lui aussi Cool



Don Everly a écrit:
Le problème, filou, c'est que seuls l' Amérique, l'Angleterre et l'Australie on connut "Young Frankie", nous en Europe, à la même époque, on avait quelqu'un d'autre qui faisait führer !

Donc quand nous avons pris connaissance de Frank Sinatra, c'était déjà un quadragénaire en costard ! Les français tout particulièrement ont du mal à imaginer qu'il a été jeune ! Laughing

Sinon Elvis, bah c'est plus compliqué que ça...il a chanté en smoking, certes, et ce n'est pas ce qu'il a fait de plus rock'n'roll ! Il l'a fait à la demande de son manager, et je connais quatres autres garçons qui ont également abandonné le cuir pour le costard (sans col) à la demande de leur manager ! Laughing

Sam a écrit:
Oui ...D'accord a propos de Frank Sinatra, mais on oublie un peu vite Hank Williams, qui fut aussi une mega Star populaire a son époque, avant le grand "boom" Elvis Presley.
Et question rebellion, le gars se posait un peu là !

Tout était dit Wink

Jim & Frank : http://www.lucyintheweb.net/lucy/forum/viewtopic.php?p=97889#97889


Tiens, il est où ton pote Sam, à propos ?

Filou
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Don Everly



Inscrit le: 03 Déc 2005
Messages: 3098
Localisation: Kentucky

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 12:53 pm    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant

Ah Sam traine sur un forum consacré aux " rock fifties", tu veux que j'aille lui tirer les oreilles ??? Laughing

Sinon, bien avant Liam Gallagher ( Rolling Eyes Laughing ), Sinatra "s'expliquait" avec les journalistes avec qui il avait un "désaccord" :







Lee Mortimer was what we would refer to today as a gossip columnist. He seemed to have a personal vendetta against Sinatra, and never missed an opportunity to disparage or insult Sinatra and his fans. Sinatra and Mortimer had a few run-ins. Sinatra, enraged at being referred to as a "“dago" and Mortimer attempting to tie him to the Mafia and the Communist Party, punched Mortimer in the nose in March 1947 at Ciro's. The Hearst papers (who employed Mortimer) promptly began attacking Sinatra full force.



April 9, 1947 arraignment (Mortimer is on the right)


Anticipating a long jury trial, Louis B. Mayer (head of MGM film studios where Sinatra was a contract player), encouraged Sinatra to settle out of court with Mortimer, which he did ($9,000).

But Sinatra got his revenge. In a broader sense, the singer's career survived Mortimer's smear campaign. But specifically, years after that, Frank, loaded, urinated on Mortimer's grave while reportedly saying "I'll bury the bastards. I'll bury them all."

Frank : "The only time I had any physical contact with a newspaper man was with a man (Lee Mortimer) who is now dead (he spits out the word dead), who said some pretty nasty things about me in a column for about two years, and they were all gross lies. He once said something to me in person (at Ciro's); I reached the boiling point, and it was all over. Frankly, if he were alive and he said it to me again, I would do it again, because he was just that kind of a man."
_________________
"Hey bird dog get away from my chick
Hey bird dog better get away quick
Bird dog you better find
A chicky little of your own ! "
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Don Everly



Inscrit le: 03 Déc 2005
Messages: 3098
Localisation: Kentucky

MessagePosté le: Jeu Aoû 30, 2012 1:01 pm    Sujet du message: Répondre en citant










_________________
"Hey bird dog get away from my chick
Hey bird dog better get away quick
Bird dog you better find
A chicky little of your own ! "
Revenir en haut de page
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Montrer les messages depuis:   
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet Aller à la page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Suivante
Page 1 sur 5


 
Sauter vers:  



Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group
Traduction par : phpBB-fr.com